honeybee

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Fact or Myth: Are Natural Antibiotics More Effective Than Traditional Antibiotics?

By | 2017-09-13T09:09:13+00:00 June 29th, 2015|History, Honey, News|

This is a Fact! Before the development of penicillin in the early 20th century, honey was mainstream medicine’s choicetreatment for wound care and persistent skin infections as natural antibiotics. Fast-acting antibiotics replaced this natural antibiotics. As our antibiotic use increased, so too did the antibiotic-resistance of many strains of bacteria. With the rise of growing antibiotic resistance, scientists are returning to good ol’ honey as a “new” solution to wound care. Research thus far has shown that honey, particularly Manuka honey, is more effective at healing skin infections and treating wounds than popular antibiotics are. A recent study conducted by researchers at Cardiff Metropolitan University and published in the journal Microbiology, found that Manuka honey eradicated 85% of a fully formed, extremely resistant strain of bacteria known as Streptococcus pyogenus. The study also indicated that Manuka honey helps prevent infection from occurring in the first place. Affirming the health benefits of honey as an antibacterial ointment, Scientific American recently reported: “In lab tests, just a bit of the honey killed off the majority of bacterial cells — and cut down dramatically on the stubborn bio-films they formed.” When wounds cluster together they form bio-films, which stimulate infection and form a barrier against antibacterial drugs. Numerous research studies attest to Manuka honey’s ability to destroy infectious bio-films. A 2009 study of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) sufferers found that honey was considerably more effective than traditional antibiotics in eliminating both planktonic and bio-film-grown forms of pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and staphylococcus aureus (SA), two important bacterial strains that cause CRS. However, it wouldn’t be advisable to apply the highly processed “Grade A” honey you find in most supermarkets to your wounds. Processed honey should never be used on a [...]

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Importance of Bees

By | 2017-09-13T09:09:13+00:00 June 25th, 2015|History, News, Uncategorized|

    Honey bees are part of the Hymenoptera order which includes, Bumble bees, Solitary bees, Wasps, Sawflies and Ants. What we can learn from bees? Studying bees adds significantly to the wider education of pupils.For example:- Bees are pollinators vital to our food chain. One third of the food we eat would not be available but for bees. Bees, like other insects, are part of a food chain. The social life of the honey bee colony provides a controversial start to thinking about the structure of societies. The tools which have evolved on the limbs and mouth parts of bees are neat examples of adaptation and engineering. The harvest from honey bees of honey, pollen, wax and propolis has nutritional, craft, manufacturing, and medical applications. Pollination by bees is important for genetic sustainability. Genes that have evolved in other animals are important to our future, too. In the UK about 70 crops are dependent on, or benefit from, visits from bees. In addition, bees pollinate the flowers of many plants which become part of the feed of farm animals. The economic value of honey bees and bumble bees as pollinators of commercially grown insect pollinated crops in the UK has been estimated at over £200 million per year. Bees are in danger of disappearing from our environment. Farming practices continue to disturb the natural habitats and forage of solitary and bumblebees at a rate which gives them little chance for re-establishment. The honey bee is under attack from the varroa mite and it is only the treatment and care provided by beekeepers that is keeping colonies alive. Most wild honey bee colonies have died out as a result of this disease. These factors, coupled [...]

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St. Ambrose … The Patron Saint of Bees

By | 2017-09-13T09:09:15+00:00 December 4th, 2014|History|

St Ambrose... The Patron Saint of Bees December 7th is the Saint Day of St. Ambrose, also known as Ambrosius. He lived from 340 AD to 397 AD and for some of his life was the Bishop of Milan. It is said that when he was an infant a swarm of bees settled on his face and, when they flew away, a drop of honey remained. He was thereafter said to have been endowed with a “honeyed tongue”. He is also the Patron Saint of Beekeepers and Candle makers. Other famous historical figures connected with bees were Hippocrates (460-370 BC), Galen (130-200 AD) and Dioscorides (40-90 AD). These were all great physicians of their time and used honey and propolis to treat wounds. Before the Greeks and Romans, the ancient Egyptians used honey and propolis for healing. Propolis in particular was used in the embalming process because of its incredible antibacterial and preservative properties. Propolis is the sticky resin which bees collect from trees and shrubs and use to sterilise their hive. It has powerful anti-bacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity and is the most important beehive product. More information about propolis will follow in future blogs. Galen invented the first recorded skin cream made from beeswax, almond or olive oil, rosewater, propolis and honey. Today this famous recipe is still made and can heal skin diseases like eczema and psoriasis. Galen also invented a cure for baldness consisting of crushed bees in honey which was smeared over the scalp. Hard to believe you may think, but.....venom from the bee stings is a vasodilator and would increase circulation; honey is full of nutrients to nourish the hair follicles; there would also be traces of [...]

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What, you may ask, is Apitherapy?

By | 2017-09-13T09:09:15+00:00 November 20th, 2014|What is apitherapy|

Apitherapy is the use of beehive products for treating or preventing illness and disease. Come with me on a fascinating and incredible journey and each week I will show you how to be healthy, with the help of the amazing little honeybee. For thousands of years, since before the time of the ancient Egyptians, mankind has revered the industrious little honeybee. For over 100 million years bees have been a vital part of our ecosystem, constantly adapting to the ever changing environment. They have evolved the perfect society......one that mankind would do well to emulate. 50,000 or more social insects work tirelessly for the good of the whole community, all with a common purpose – survival of their species. To do this they must address all the factors inherent in the survival process. They will need the tools to build a home, a source of good nutrition, a means of keeping disease at bay, guards to protect them all, and a mother who will lay eggs day and night to replace those who have perished in the sacrifice that is their destiny. I invite you to join me on this journey............ AMBROSIUS

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